The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

TN SDC




EMPLOYMENT, UNEMPLOYMENT, WAGES AND INDUSTRY

Employment is one of the most closely monitored economic indicators with strong job growth indicating prosperity and sustained job losses indicating recession. The two most reported measures of employment are the Nonfarm Payroll Employment and the Labor Force Report. It is important to understand the differences in these two measures. Nonfarm employment, sometimes referred to as the "Establishment Survey" or "Employment, Hours and Earnings report," is based on the monthly Current Employment Statistics (CES) Survey of 390,000 establishments. It does not include the self-employed, but it does sample firms of all sizes. The Labor Force Report, sometimes referred to as the "Household Survey" is based on the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS), which is a survey of 60,000 households. This survey determines the size of the labor force and includes the self-employed, unpaid family workers, ag workers, and private household workers, who are excluded in the establishment survey. The CPS also determines the number of people employed, unemployed and the unemployment rate.


Tennessee Employment by Sector

  Dec 2015 Jan 2016 Feb 2016 Mar 2016 Apr 2016 May 2016 June 2016 July 2016 Aug 2016 Sept 2016 Oct 2016 Nov 2016
Total Nonfarm
2,941.2
2,952.4
2,951.5
2,951.7
2,952.2
2,941.4
2,951.3
2,958.6
2,965.3
2,981.1
2,985.8
2,983.0
  % Chg from Year Ago
3.0%
3.3%
3.1%
3.2%
2.9%
2.2%
2.3%
2.1%
2.2%
2.5%
2.3%
1.9%
Mining, Logging & Const
121.9
126.1
126.2
124.7
121.2
119.5
121.0
123.5
124.9
125.3
125.0
125.3
  % Chg from Year Ago
6.6%
9.1%
8.9%
9.0%
5.3%
2.6%
3.3%
4.7%
5.7%
5.7%
4.2%
3.9%
Durable Goods Mfg
213.3
215.2
215.9
216.0
217.2
217.0
218.2
217.2
216.4
216.4
216.3
215.2
  % Chg from Year Ago
2.4%
3.5%
3.6%
3.6%
3.8%
3.1%
3.8%
3.3%
2.7%
2.0%
2.1%
1.1%
Non-Durable Goods Mfg
124.7
124.8
124.7
125.6
124.5
125.7
125.1
125.0
124.5
124.9
125.0
124.7
  % Chg from Year Ago
3.4%
3.0%
2.8%
4.0%
2.5%
3.5%
2.7%
2.5%
1.9%
2.4%
2.0%
0.9%
Wholesale Trade
124.9
124.3
125.1
124.9
125.8
124.6
125.4
125.5
125.5
125.6
124.7
125.2
  % Chg from Year Ago
3.9%
3.2%
3.9%
4.2%
4.8%
3.4%
3.6%
3.5%
3.3%
3.0%
1.3%
0.8%
Retail Trade
328.4
332.8
334.1
336.6
334.6
332.1
331.6
332.7
332.8
333.1
333.7
332.3
  % Chg from Year Ago
1.9%
3.4%
3.7%
4.4%
3.3%
2.2%
1.7%
1.8%
1.7%
1.7%
1.9%
1.3%
Transportation & Utilities
161.4
159.3
158.5
157.4
157.5
158.4
158.6
157.3
157.4
158.7
157.6
158.8
  % Chg from Year Ago
6.1%
4.7%
3.9%
2.9%
2.7%
2.5%
1.7%
-0.1%
-0.4%
0.3%
0.4%
-0.1%
Information
43.7
43.6
43.2
44.0
44.2
44.3
44.2
44.3
45.9
46.0
45.0
45.4
  % Chg from Year Ago
0.5%
0.2%
-0.9%
0.9%
0.9%
1.1%
0.5%
0.7%
4.1%
4.1%
2.7%
3.7%
Financial Activities
149.8
150.8
151.1
151.6
150.7
151.0
150.9
150.9
151.7
152.1
152.8
153.1
  % Chg from Year Ago
2.7%
3.1%
3.1%
3.4%
2.9%
2.8%
2.0%
1.8%
2.2%
2.3%
2.6%
1.7%
Prof & Business Services
402.1
405.2
401.5
401.1
402.8
399.2
399.5
399.7
406.8
408.7
408.1
410.5
  % Chg from Year Ago
4.4%
5.4%
4.4%
3.9%
3.6%
2.3%
1.9%
0.9%
2.9%
3.2%
2.5%
3.0%
Educ & Health Services
423.0
423.8
424.2
427.3
428.0
430.2
431.9
432.4
433.8
435.9
438.1
437.6
  % Chg from Year Ago
3.2%
3.1%
3.2%
3.7%
3.9%
4.3%
4.7%
4.4%
4.5%
4.8%
4.5%
4.2%
Leisure & Hospitality
312.6
312.1
312.1
310.5
312.5
310.2
313.0
314.2
314.1
315.0
318.3
316.4
  % Chg from Year Ago
3.8%
3.2%
2.6%
2.8%
2.5%
1.0%
1.8%
1.6%
1.4%
1.2%
2.1%
1.7%
Other Services
107.8
108.8
109.1
108.6
109.2
109.0
110.3
111.4
109.7
110.4
110.3
108.8
  % Chg from Year Ago
1.0%
1.8%
2.1%
2.1%
2.2%
1.6%
3.0%
3.9%
2.1%
2.4%
2.6%
0.6%
Government
427.6
425.6
425.8
423.4
424.0
420.2
421.6
424.2
421.0
429.0
430.9
429.7
  % Chg from Year Ago
0.6%
0.2%
0.4%
0.0%
0.1%
-0.3%
-0.2%
0.3%
-0.5%
1.0%
1.0%
0.6%
Note: All Employees in Thousands (Seasonally Adjusted)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics


Tennessee Average Hourly Earnings by Sector (US$)

  Dec 2015 Jan 2016 Feb 2016 Mar 2016 Apr 2016 May 2016 June 2016 July 2016 Aug 2016 Sept 2016 Oct 2016 Nov 2016
Total Private 21.14 21.47 21.34 21.36 21.38 21.67 21.53 21.78 21.72 22.10 22.32 22.23
Manufacturing 21.99 22.32 22.39 22.20 22.46 22.90 23.06 23.48 23.31 24.13 23.83 24.19
Trade, Transportation, and Utilities 18.90 19.20 18.96 19.11 19.29 19.87 19.52 19.83 19.87 20.07 20.34 19.76
Information 28.64 29.31 28.68 27.81 27.90 28.79 28.22 28.84 28.57 29.12 29.82 29.71
Financial Activities 26.27 26.47 26.48 25.97 26.40 27.02 26.53 26.59 25.94 26.36 26.72 26.67
Professional and Business Services 24.28 24.91 24.90 25.35 24.79 24.94 25.17 25.29 25.10 25.83 26.26 26.09
Education and Health Services 22.07 22.53 22.23 22.22 22.49 22.36 22.36 22.59 22.45 22.45 22.67 22.60
Leisure and Hospitality 12.38 12.19 12.36 12.24 12.18 12.20 12.22 12.41 12.57 12.74 12.84 13.10
Other Services 19.64 19.52 19.56 19.51 19.57 19.85 19.34 19.18 19.55 19.64 20.00 19.64
Mining, Logging, and Construction 23.49 23.27 22.96 23.35 22.99 23.22 22.90 23.17 23.07 22.98 23.39 23.52
Note: All Employees in (Not Seasonally Adjusted)

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics


Labor Force

Employment and unemployment (labor force) estimates are available from several major surveys and programs:

SURVEY DESCRIPTION FREQUENCY
Current Population Survey (CPS) (Household Survey)

The official monthly estimates of employment, unemployment, and the unemployment rate for the nation and states. A monthly survey of about 60,000 households conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau for BLS It provides a comprehensive body of data on the labor force, employment, unemployment, persons not in the labor force, hours of work, earnings, and other demographic and labor force characteristics.

Based on where people live.

CPS Labor Force Statistics

CPS Weekly and Hourly Earnings

CPS Marital and Family Labor Force Statistics

Monthly
American Community Survey (ACS) The ACS is the largest household survey in the United States. The sample size of approximately 3 million addresses per year make it useful for subnational analyses. The ACS labor force questions are based on the Census 2000 questions. Because of its large sample size, the ACS will have advantages over the CPS in producing estimates in the following circumstances:
  • to characterize small geographic areas for which CPS (or Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program) estimates are not available, and for comparisons among such areas and between such areas and larger ones;
  • to provide information on socioeconomic characteristics of the labor force that are not collected in the CPS, or for geographic areas below the level for which the CPS can provide this information;
  • to produce tabulations of finely detailed categories, or extensive cross-tabulations of multiple characteristics of the labor force for any geographic area, including the nation, for which the CPS sample size is insufficient to produce reliable estimates;
  • to study rare characteristics of common population groups, or characteristics of uncommon population groups;
Based on where people live.
Annual. Single-year labor force estimates for geographic areas with a population of 65,000 or more; 3-year estimates for geographic areas with a population of 20,000 or more; 5-year estimates for areas with a population less than 20,000.
Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) Program

Monthly labor force and unemployment estimates for states, labor market areas (LMAs), and other areas covered under federal assistance programs are developed by state employment security agencies and the BLS under the federal-state cooperative LAUS program. LAUS program data are pegged to the place of residence and labor force concepts of the CPS. The LAUS program uses several methods to produce estimates for more than 7,000 geographic areas, including all counties and cities of 25,000 or more. The concepts and definitions underlying LAUS data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS), the household survey that is the official measure of the labor force for the nation.

Data are provided by place of residence for total civilian labor force, total number of people employed, total number of people unemployed . and the unemployment rate

LAUS Data Query -- Get d etailed LAUS statistics

LAUS Map -- Create customized maps

 

 

Monthly and Annual
Current Employment Statistics (CES) (Payroll Survey)

Counts the number of employees on employer payrolls. Each month the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program of the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) surveys about 141,000 businesses and government agencies, representing approximately 486,000 individual worksites, in order to provide detailed industry data on employment, hours, and earnings of workers on nonfarm payrolls. BLS and State workforce agencies cooperate in the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program. In this program, State agencies are responsible for preparing current employment estimates for the States and for many metropolitan labor market areas, while BLS is responsible for producing monthly employment estimates for the Nation. CES estimates of employment, average weekly and hourly earnings, and average weekly hours are derived from an employer survey of approximately 440,000 nonfarm establishments, selected primarily from the QCEW administrative records of UI-covered employers. The national and State industry CES estimates are then benchmarked annually to QCEW employment data. Supplemental sources are used in benchmarking industries that have workers that are not covered.

Based on where people work.

Monthly
Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP)

The Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) is a longitudinal survey. It is useful mainly for examining the dynamics of employment change (including spells of unemployment) for the same individuals over time.

Based on where people live.

Wave
Unemployment Insurance (UI) Administrative Records

Statistics on persons receiving unemployment insurance benefits (sometimes called insured unemployment) in the United States are collected as a byproduct of unemployment insurance programs. Workers who lose their jobs and are covered by these programs typically file claims which serve as notice that they are beginning a period of unemployment. Initial claims measure emerging unemployment and continued weeks claimed measure the number of persons claiming unemployment benefits.

Based on people eligible for UI benefits and relate to the place of insurance coverage of the establishment.

Monthly and Annual
Occupational Employment Statistics (OES)

Produces employment and wage estimates for over 800 occupations. These are estimates of the number of people employed in certain occupations, and estimates of the wages paid to them. Self-employed persons are not included in the estimates. These estimates are available for the nation as a whole, for individual States, and for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas; national occupational estimates for specific industries are also available.

Monthly
Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages (QCEW)

A summarized count of quarterly employment and wages reported by employers covering 98 percent of U.S. jobs, available at the county, MSA, state and national levels by industry. QCEW monthly employment data represent the number of covered workers who worked during, or received pay for, the pay period that included the 12th day of the month.

Virtually all workers are reported in the State in which their jobs are located.

             

Monthly and Annual

KEY DIFFERENCES Among the Employment and Unemployment Estimates from the American Community Survey, the Current Population Survey, and the Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program

Estimates of employment and unemployment from a particular program may differ from those of other programs because of variations in definitions, coverage, methods of collection, reference periods, estimation procedures, residency requirements, response rates, and timing of responses. These variations, in turn, arise from differences in the programs’ purposes. The various estimates of employment and unemployment generally complement one another, with each providing a different type of information that the others cannot suitably supply. This multiplicity of sources makes it important to understand when it is appropriate to use the data from each source. The following chart summarizes the key differences between the ACS, CPS, and LAUS:

  American Community Survey Current Population Survey Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program
Principal Purpose Replace decennial census long form by providing annual and multi-year estimates of selected social, economic, and housing characteristics of the population for many geographic areas and subpopulations. Produce the official monthly estimates of employment and unemployment for the United States, andannual-averageestimates for states and metropolitan areas. Produce other socioeconomic and demographic estimates for the United States, and estimates for states for selected characteristics and subpopulations. Produce monthly labor force and unemployment estimates for states and selected substate areas.
Geography Single-year estimates for geographic areas with a population of 65,000 or more (this includes the nation, all states and the District of Columbia, all congressional districts, approximately 800 counties, and 500 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas, among others) and 3-year estimates for geographic areas with a population of 20,000 or more (this includes the nation, all states and the District of Columbia, all congressional districts, approximately 1,800 counties, and 900 metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas, among others). For areas with a population less than 20,000, 5-year estimates will be available. The first 5-year estimates, based on ACS data collected from 2005 through 2009, will be released in 2010. Monthly estimates for the nation; annual-average estimates for states and large metropolitan areas and cities. Monthly and annual estimates for over 7,000 geographic areas including all cities and counties of 25,000 or more, and all cities and towns in New England.
Sample Size About 3 million addresses per year. Data are collected from about one-twelfth of the sample each month. About 73,000 addresses per month. An address is in sample for 4 consecutive months, out for the following 8 months, back in for the next 4 months, and then retired from the sample. The LAUS program is not directly based on a sample. Estimates for states and large substate areas are produced from statistical models; other estimates are prepared through indirect estimation techniques.
Data Collection Method Mail, telephone, and personal-visit interviews for the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. About half the responses are obtained by mail. The ACS is a mandatory survey. Telephone and personal-visit interviews for the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The CPS is a voluntary survey. The LAUS program does not conduct interviews.
Residency Status The ACS includes a person at the address where they are at the time of the survey if they have been there, or will be there, more than 2 months, whether or not they have a "usual residence elsewhere." The CPS sample unit's householder (one of the people in whose name the unit is rented or owned) must consider the unit to be their place of usual residence (where they spend most of the time during the year) to be counted as an occupied unit. If a family has more than one home, the interviewer has to determine if the sample unit is their usual residence. Data are collected for all people who usually live or stay at the address even if they are temporarily away for reasons such as travel, hospitalization, or school attendance. Same as the CPS.
Population Universe The ACS includes both the household and group quarters populations (that is, the residentpopulation). The group quarters population consists of the institutionalized (such as people in correctional institutions or nursing homes) and the noninstitutionalized (most of whom are in college dormitories). The weighting is controlled to population estimates as of July 1 (e.g., July 1, 2003 for the 2003 ACS). The CPS includes the civilian noninstitutionalizedpopulation. This universe includes civilians in households, people in noninstitutional group quarters (other than military barracks) and military in households living off post or with their families on post (as long as at least one household member is a civilian adult). The universe excludes other military in households and in group quarters (barracks), and people living in institutions. The weighting is controlled to population estimates as of the first day of the month in which the data are collected (e.g., July 1, 2003 for the July 2003 CPS data). Same as the CPS.
Time Period Covered Employment status refers to the full calendar week prior to the week when the respondent answers the questions. Employment status for a given month refers to the calendar week including the 12th day of the month. Same as the CPS.
Length and Detail of Questions The ACS uses a series of seven questions to classify an individual's employment status; these questions ask about work status, layoff, job search, and availability for work. The CPS uses a series of 16 questions to classify an individual's employment status; it asks about self-employment, job tenure, work status, unpaid family work, hours worked, layoff, active and passive methods of job search, and availability for work. The LAUS program does not conduct interviews, but it uses the same concepts as the CPS and relies on the data from the CPS (among other data sources).

FAQ

QUESTION ANSWER
What is the difference in the three different BLS establishment-based employment measures. The BLS publishes three different establishment-based employment measures for any given quarter. Each of these measures-the QCEW, BED, and CES-makes use of the quarterly UI employment reports in producing data. QCEW data are similar to monthly Current Employment Statistics (CES) data in that they reflect jobs by place of work; therefore, if a person holds two jobs, he or she is counted twice. However, since the QCEW program, by definition, only measures employment covered by unemployment insurance laws, its totals will not be the same as CES employment totals due to the employee categories excluded by UI. While QCEW employment data are summarized from quarterly reports submitted by 9.0 million U.S. establishments. CPS counts employed persons, whereas the QCEW program counts covered workers who earned wages during the pay period that includes the 12th of the month. Consequently, CPS includes persons “with a job but not at work” who earn no wages—for example, workers on extended unpaid leaves of absence. QCEW data, by contrast, exclude unpaid workers. QCEW data count separately each job held by multiple jobholders. CPS counts such workers once, in the job at which they worked the most hours. CPS counts employed persons at their place of residence; the QCEW program counts jobs at the place of work. CPS also differs from the QCEW program, in that it includes self-employed persons; unpaid family workers employed 15 or more hours during the survey period; and a greater proportion of agricultural and domestic workers. CPS data exclude persons under age 16, while the QCEW program counts all covered workers, regardless of age.
What is the relationship between the LAUS and ACS labor force estimates? The American Community Survey (ACS) produces annual information on social, housing, and economic characteristics—including labor force status—for demographic groups in areas of 65,000 population or more. Data are published about 8 months following the reference year. The LAUS program produces the official monthly estimates of the labor force for all States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and all substate areas. The LAUS estimates are consistent with the national labor force and unemployment measures from the Current Population Survey. LAUS statewide estimates are published about 2-1/2 to 3 weeks following the reference month, and metropolitan area data are published about 1-1/2 weeks later.
How are the components of labor force (civilian labor force, employed, unemployed, and unemployment rate) defined? The concepts and definitions underlying LAUS data come from the Current Population Survey (CPS), the household survey that is the official measure of the labor force for the nation. State monthly model estimates are controlled in "real time" to sum to national monthly labor force estimates from the CPS. These models combine current and historical data from the CPS, the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program, and State unemployment insurance (UI) systems. Civilian labor force: Included are all persons in the civilian noninstitutional population classified as either employed or unemployed. Employed persons: These are all persons who, during the reference week that includes the 12th day of the month): (a) did any work as paid employees, worked in their own business or profession or on their own farm, or worked 15 hours or more as unpaid workers in an enterprise operated by a member of their family, or (b) were not working but had jobs from which they were temporarily absent because of vacation, illness, bad weather, childcare problems, maternity or paternity leave, labor-management dispute job training, or other family or personal reasons, whether or not they were paid for the time off or were seeking other jobs. Each employed person is counted only once, even if he or she holds more than one job. Unemployed persons: Included are all persons who had no employment during the reference week, were available for work, except for temporary illness, and had made specific efforts to find employment some time during the 4-week period ending with the reference week. Persons who were waiting to be recalled to a job from which they had been laid off need not have been looking for work to be classified as unemployed. Unemployment rate: The ratio of unemployed to the civilian labor force expressed as a percent, i.e., 100 * (unemployed/labor force).
Why aren’t data for all areas (the nation, states, and sub-state areas) available at the same time? The timing of data availability is controlled by the length of time required to produce and validate estimates. Data for the nation, which come directly from the Current Population Survey, are available earliest; data for states and census regions and divisions are available generally about two weeks later; data for metropolitan areas and divisions are available after about another week and a half; and data for micropolitan areas, combined areas, counties, cities, and New England towns are available last, a week after the metropolitan area and division release. View the data release schedule.
What is the difference between job losers and the unemployed? People who have lost a job make up a large portion of those classified as unemployed each month. There are also people who have voluntarily left jobs, those who have newly entered or re-entered the labor force but not yet found a job, and individuals who have recently completed temporary jobs and are looking for employment. View Definitions of Labor Force Concepts (PDF) for a more detailed description of these labor force concepts.
What are "household" and "establishment" data, and how do they differ? "Household" data, as from the Current Population Survey (CPS), pertain to individuals and relate to where they reside. "Establishment" data, such as those from the Current Employment Statistics survey of businesses, pertain to jobs (persons on payrolls) and where those jobs are located. The data developed through the LAUS program are based on the household concept of the CPS. For information on these surveys and how they differ, see Household vs. Establishment Series.
What is seasonal adjustment? Seasonal adjustment is a statistical technique that eliminates the influences of weather, holidays, the opening and closing of schools, and other recurring seasonal events from economic time series. This permits easier observation and analysis of cyclical, trend, and other nonseasonal movements in the data. By eliminating seasonal fluctuations, the series becomes smoother and it is easier to compare data from month to month. View a more complete description of seasonal adjustment and the methodology used to estimate seasonal adjustment factors.
Why are some of the detailed data available at the national level not also available at the state, metropolitan area, county, and city level? National data come from the Current Population Survey. The survey sample size is not large enough to provide all the data at a local, or even a state, level. National data are NOT the sum of local area estimates.
What does the term "benchmarked" mean? Labor force data are revised at the end of each year for as more complete information becomes available. This process is called "benchmarking" and it is federally mandated. View more information on the annual benchmark process and the seasonally adjusted model.

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Business Employment Dynamics

Business Employment Dynamics is a set of statistics generated from the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages program. These quarterly data series consist of gross job gains and gross job losses statistics from 1992 forward. These data help to provide a picture of the dynamic state of the labor market. Business Employment Dynamics (BED) data are a product of the QCEW program. BED data are compiled by BLS from existing quarterly State UI records. Most employers in the United States are required to file quarterly reports on the employment and wages of workers covered by UI laws and to pay quarterly UI taxes. Quarterly UI reports are sent by State workforce agencies to the Bureau and form the basis of the BLS establishment sampling frame. These reports also are used to produce quarterly QCEW data on total employment and wages and the longitudinal BED data on gross job gains and losses. Other important BLS uses of the UI reports are in the CES program.

In the BED program, the quarterly UI records are linked across quarters to provide a longitudinal history for each establishment. The linkage process allows the tracking of net employment changes at the establishment level, in turn allowing the estimation of jobs gained at opening and expanding establishments and of jobs lost at closing and contracting establishments.

 

County Business Patterns

County Business Patterns (CBP) is an annual series that provides subnational economic data by industry. This series includes the number of establishments, employment during the week of March 12, first quarter payroll, and annual payroll. This data is useful for studying the economic activity of small areas; analyzing economic changes over time; and as a benchmark for other statistical series, surveys, and databases between economic censuses. Businesses use the data for analyzing market potential, measuring the effectiveness of sales and advertising programs, setting sales quotas, and developing budgets. Government agencies use the data for administration and planning. ZIP Code Business Patterns data are available shortly after the release of County Business Patterns. It provides the number of establishments by employment-size classes by detailed industry in the U.S.

 

2011 CBP is scheduled for release in June 2013. 2010 CBP was released in July 2012.

CBP Tables

U.S., States, and Counties 1,2 (1998-2010)

Select Area

Zip Codes 3 (1998 to 2010) (Enter 5-digit ZIP Code)

Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas 4 (1998-2010)

Select Area

Quarterly Workforce Indicators

The Quarterly Workforce Indicators (QWI) are a set of economic indicators—including employment, job creation, wages, and worker turnover—that can be queried by different levels of geography—state, county, metro, and workforce investment area—as well as by detailed industry, gender, and age of workers. You can query the data directly by using the Census QWI Online tools below. State Labor Market Information (LMI) agencies supply key data from unemployment wage records and from businesses each quarter. The Census Bureau merges the data from the LMIs with current demographic information to produce the Local Employment Dynamics (LED) data.

 

NAICS-based employment, job creation, wages, and worker turnover by geography,as well as by detailed industry, gender, and age of workers.

 

SIC-based employment, job creation, wages, and worker turnover by geography, as well as by detailed industry, gender, and age of workers. Note, the SIC-based QWI ceased to be updated as of the 2007Q2 data update.

A mapping and reporting tool showing employment and home locations of workers with companion reports for user-defined areas.

FAQs

QUESTION ANSWER
Why aren't QWI data available for all states? All 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands have been in the LED partnership since December, 2010. However, not every state partner has passed through the experimental production phase. In addition, individual state partners may periodically be put on production hold because of issues that are encountered in submission of new data files, and some state partners may occasionally miss their file submission. These infrequent occurrences also create a lag in data availability.
What types of employment are included in the QWI?

The QWI are built upon wage records in the Unemployment Insurance (UI) system and information from state ES-202 data. The universe of QWI data is UI-covered earnings. UI coverage is broad, covering over 90% of total wage and salary civilian jobs. When QWI private industry employment numbers are compared with other employment data, exclusions to UI coverage should be taken into account. Federal government employment is not generally included. Exempted employment varies slightly from state to state due to variations in state unemployment laws, but generally also excludes many farmers and agricultural employees, domestic workers, self-employed non-agricultural workers, members of the Armed Services, some state and local government employees as well as certain types of nonprofit employers andreligious organizations (which are given a choice of coverage or noncoverage in a number of states).

What is LEHD?

Longitudinal Employer-Household Dynamics (LEHD) is an innovative program within the U.S. Census Bureau. We use modern statistical and computing techniques to combine federal and state administrative data on employers and employees with core Census Bureau censuses and surveys while protecting the confidentiality of people and firms that provide the data.

What is LED?

Local Employment Dynamics (LED) is a voluntary partnership between state labor market information agencies and the U.S. Census Bureau to develop new information about local labor market conditions at low cost, with no added respondent burden, and with the same confidentiality protections afforded census and survey data.

TN Labor Market Information

The Labor Market Information LMI/Research and Statistics Section is the official source for all employment-related data for the state, the metropolitan areas, and the individual counties.


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Connect with Tennessee State Data Center to receive the most current data updates and to connect with other data users.

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Please let us know if we can help your organization find a solution using Census Bureau products. You may email us at tnsdc@utk.edu, and you may subscribe to the Tennessee State Data Center to receive email notification when new data products for Tennessee are available.

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